Band name etymologies

From Sharp Young Men to Faith No More

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M Morris, what are the stories behind the band names 'Sharp Young Men' and 'Faith. No Man'?

Morris: The original name ‘Sharp Young Men’ was a piss-take on all the ‘elegant’ 80s groups at the time, it was meant to be smart-arsed, ironic, similar to the 'Bright Young Things' of the 20s, whatever. The name 'Faith.No Man' came about during a rehearsal when the others decided that 'Sharp Young Men' was 'too straight' sounding. So I proposed the name 'Faith In No Man'. Bordin responded saying it was 'too wordy' and suggested shortening it to Faith. No Man. The full stop (.) was intentional and always has been a part of the name.

Bill Gould, there are two stories about the band name Faith. No More out there:
1) It was suggested by your friend, Will Carpmill, seeing as The Man was essensially no more.
2) Named after a race horse you saw listed on a racing form.
Which one is correct?

Gould: The truth? The race horse story was just something we told press because they always asked that same boring question on every interview. The real horse Faith No More ran in the years beginning 1988. The Will Carpmill story is correct.

And from Faith. No More to Faith No More, what happened to the full stop (.)?

Gould: The period? No reason, we just stopped using it. We didn't even have to discuss it. I don't think any of us ever cared for it, it was a carryover from the Faith No Man days.

   

So Will Carpmill, how did you come up with the name Faith. No More?                   

Carpmill: Mike Bordin and I were in class, trying to come up with a new band name for FNM. Possibly 1983? We were passing the sheet of paper back and forth with our ideas, riffing on "Faith. No Man". I think I might have suggested "Faith. No Morris" with a laugh and then a few seconds later one of us had "Faith. No More". Not sure if it was me or  Mike. A guy sitting behind us in class, who apparently was also not listening to the lecture, told us that "Faith. No More" is the exact semantic opposite of "Semper Fidelis", which is the US Marine Corps motto, "Always Faithful".

 

Mike Bordin tells the "race horse" story.